A note on sources and credits

As far as possible photographs that are not mine are posted here with permission; thank you to all contributors to 'Jet & Prop', especially photographers Tad Dippel, Neil Cotten and Nico Charpentier, the editor of the magnificent 'Avions' magazine Michel Ledet and Jean-Yves Lorant, author, researcher and archivist at the Service Historique de la Défense, Paris. Images from the IWM and Roger Freeman collections are published here under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Licence. Occasionally some images on this site have been 'reposted' from facebook or ebay. They are used non-commercially in an educational context to depict historical events. If such is deemed necessary they can be removed on simple request. Contact me at falkeeins at aol.com. All rights reserved.

Sunday, 16 September 2012

Budd RB C-93 Conestoga -Rare Birds (1)


Here's a rare type that I failed to identify on the aviation quiz pages of the world affairs board - the Budd /RB C-93 Conestoga. The Conestoga was a transport built by the Budd railroad car company and constructed of spot welded stainless steel sheet metal as an insurance against shortage of light alloys. The first prototype flew on 31 October 1943. About 800 aircraft were ordered by the US Army and US Navy but there never was an aluminium shortage, so the need for the RB disappeared and only 17 aircraft were built. 




" ....During an Easter week-end motorhome trip back in the 1980's our families stayed overnight at the Douglas Muni AP. In the morning we went for a hike out to an old relic abandoned far out away from the runways. Neither my friend nor I, despite long careers in the airplane business had any idea what this airplane was. A few months later when in Wash DC I stopped in at the Air Museum to inquire about it. They ushered my back to the working area and introduced me to an old timer who listened to my story. He knew almost instantly (how many stainless steel two engine cargo airplanes were there after all?). He copied some old newspaper articles and gave them to me. I subsequently sent them to the Pima Air Museum. I don't recall ever hearing back from them but this may have been the link that saved the old relic which is now on display at the Pima Museum, presuming that it's the same S/N.."


More at 
http://www.aviastar.org/air/usa/budd_conestoga.php